"Scorpio Love Song"

© 1970 Lee Ruth

MP3
Jerome Wheeler - Vocal & Banjo
  MP3 Sample of Lee's Original

 

Song Lyrics:
Lee's Lyrics:
Nobody ever wanted your body
The way that I want your body.
Nobody ever longed to reach to touch you
The way I want to touch you.
All my senses are in flight
Moving to you in the night.
Nobody ever wanted your body the way that I do.
Nobody else has ever seen you
In the light that I have seen you.
No one has seen the contrast and the brightness
The shadow and the sunlight playing
And the clouds that bring the rain
As they come and go again.
No one else has ever seen you the way that I do.
Nobody ever wanted your body
The way that I want your body.
Nobody ever longed to reach to touch you
The way I want to touch you.
All my senses take delight
As they find you in the night.
Nobody ever wanted your body the way that I do.
Nobody ever wanted your body
The way that I want your body
Nobody ever longed to reach, to touch you
The way that I want to touch you

All my senses are in flight
Moving to you in the night
Nobody ever wanted your body
The way that I do
-----------
No one else has ever seen you
In the light that I have seen you
No one has seen the contrast and the brightness
The shadow and the sunshine playing

And the clouds that bring the rain
As they come and go again
No one else has ever seen you
The way that I do
-----------
Nobody ever wanted your body
The way that I want your body
Nobody ever longed to reach, to touch you
The way that I want to touch you

All my senses take delight
As they find you in the night
Nobody ever wanted your body
The way that I do

Artist on the Song:
Lee on the Song:

One of the things that we all had in common besides Jamming and
Hanging Out was writing songs. Man, there were lots of good songwriters come out of that time. The Poets were kicking A** all over the streets and campus but they were into lyrics and rhythms of words. Songsters (people who actually would sing a melody with words) included Lee Ruth, Ken Shepherd, Mike Cochran, Tom Cooke, Steve Hutchison, Glen Ward, Tom McCarg, Steve Meyerhardt, Don Cooper, plus many more I simply can't remember but they were there and we wrote songs and we had the guts to play them for each other and for audiences, tough audiences who wanted top 40 stuff. It was perhaps the best of times for most of us and even now most of us cannot in any way shape or fashion write about it. The songs that did survive were about people, how we felt about things, how we got along, what are we gonna do now kind of things. We were warming our butts on the sidewalk in front of the Ivanhoe one night after close when I first heard "Scorpio Love Song." Lee didn't show a lot of tunes back then but he played this one for us and it knocked us out. I said, "Lee, man, if that don't get you some love and tumble, nothing will." He just smiled that Scorpio smile of his and got all secretive like Scorpios do.
Not being a Scorpio myself, and high on Vitamins (cough cough), I went home that night and wrote, "Would You Like to Get High and Ball," hoping for some love and tumble of my own. Ended up being voted Male Chauvinist of the Year by a group of feminists from St. Looey, I should have just learned Lee's tune and left it at that, something I decided to finally do for this CD project. Sorry ladies, I am already in love and I thought of her (for inspiration) while I was recording it--something I made sure she knew. Ain't love grand?

When this project got underway and I was gathering my songs together to offer them up for grabs to prospective participants, I decided not to include a few songs, including this one, so I left it off the list. Soon thereafter, I suggested "Sometimes I Miss My Home" as a good fit for The Celebrated Renaissance Band and I was surprised when Jerome Wheeler said that he'd sorta hoped to take a crack at "Scorpio Love Song." I remembered then that back in 1970-71, when the song was new, Jerome frequently requested that I sing it. The CRB's arrangement of SIMMH featured Dan Peek on the lead vocal with Jerome singing a harmony line. It took a suggestion from Jerry Foster to remind me how much the album would be enhanced if Jerome's voice was clearly to be heard somewhere on it, so I offered him an exclusive shot at "Scorpio Love Song." Glad he took me up on it, and his solo banjo accompaniment underscores starkly his recognition that, contrary to some people's notions about the song back during the brief period of time when I was singing it in public, it really was and is a love song. I suspect that most everybody, in his or her "deep heart's core" (to borrow a phrase from William Butler Yeats), feels this way or has felt this way about somebody they love.
Artist on Lee Ruth:
Lee on the Artist:
I first met Lee at the Chez back in 1963, I think it was. Dan Peek and I were playing Old Timey music on banjo and guitar. We got along right from the start. Went outside after our set and started jamming. We must
have jammed all night. For the next 7 years we jammed in McAlester Park, in the Ivanhoe Parking Lot, onstage at Max's Campus Snacks, the Chez, Corn's Lake, the Ivanhoe back room, the Archway beneath the entrance to the quadrangle. And kept jamming whenever we ran into each other over the years. He was the beard in Heavens Bright Babies, a play
Bummer and I did at Gladstones. It's true that MU moved the lions underneath the arches by the Jschool because of Lee. We all used to alter our consciousness (cough, cough) and jam all night there. The ROTC guys would be mustering for their morning marches on the Columns Yard at an ungodly hour to get up and we would break into "Feel Like I'm Fixing to Die Rag" or "ROTC Rag" by Tom McCarg, a great songwriter from that time. The Arches had Great Acoustics. Anyplace where people were jamming Lee was sure to be there. The guy could play anything, any song. He knew who played what on what record and who wrote what on what song. I went over to his house once and he lived in a basement and the basement was full of nothing but records--45's, 78's, piano rolls, reel-to-reel tapes. I said "No wonder you never sleep, it must hurt getting your beard caught in these 45 hole spacers!"
In the almost 40 years I've known him, there is probably no one I've had more occasions to play music with than Jerome,, though off and on he lived away from Columbia for a considerable number of years, and until this year (2003) we had never played in a group together. He always had some big musical adventure going for him--a band, a play, another band, another play, on the road--yet somehow there were those many late nights on the streets of Columbia, in the J-school arch, in the studio, occasional onstage gigs together, living rooms, front porches, back stages, back porches, playing all night on "Radio Omega" on KOPN radio--where didn't we play? No matter how divergent our lives have been, we always seem to find common musical ground when our musical paths intersect. My pleasure, Jerome!
Producer's Notes:
Recording Credits:
I first met Jerome in the early 1980s, when I had just moved back to Missouri from Oregon. Jerome was producing one of his Rock operas "B-Movies from Outer Space," and I had numerous friends involved in that production. I also met Pete Skolka at the same time--he was the musical arranger for the production. Since then our musical pathways have crossed many many times--live at KOPN's studios or on various projects that Jerome and Pete have worked on in the various configurations of Pete's studio. Over the years we have used each other as extra sets of ears on our projects. Jerome and Pete have a CD that they have worked on for over ten years--the "Dot Commies." I was honored to hear parts of its production, there are some great songs on on it! Jerome has been and continues to be an incredible songwriter--he too deserves a tribute anthology. For this project, Jerome originally chose "Oh Be Joyful," a mandolin instrumental of Lee's, but after some changes decided on a song I never heard called "Scorpio Love Song." The session took place on my birthday. Jerome was not in the best of health that day and in pain laid down a stigmatic marked stellar version of the song. If you listen close you can hear the blood and passion on the tracks. What a gift to this project! Thanks Jerome.

Recorded at Pete Szkolka's Studio

Record Date: 7/22/03

Recorded live to two-track

 

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